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Joseph Stiglitz: Economist

Joseph Stiglitz: Economist

Joseph Stiglitz is an American economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences and the John Bates Clark Medal. In 2011 he was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Brookings: Marijuana Policy

Brookings: Marijuana Policy

Stuart Taylor, Jr. examines how the federal government and the eighteen states (plus the District of Columbia) that have partially legalized medical or recreational marijuana or both since 1996 can be true to their respective laws, and can agree on how to enforce them wisely while avoiding federal-state clashes that would increase confusion and harm communities and consumers.

Brookings: Importance of Manufacturing

Brookings: Importance of Manufacturing

Manufacturing—or rather advanced manufacturing—is essential to the U.S. economy because it is the main source of innovation and global competitiveness for the United States. Simply put, advanced manufacturing is the U.S. pipeline for new products and productivity-enhancing processes.

Brookings: Legalized Marijuana

Brookings: Legalized Marijuana

In November, two states, Colorado and Washington, passed ballot initiatives — by strong margins — to legalize marijuana use. Avoiding a state-federal train wreck over marijuana policy will not happen automatically. Finding a cooperative path requires creativity and energy from both levels of government. But the alternative won’t satisfy anyone, at least not for long.

Nation of Change: Solar Economy

Nation of Change: Solar Economy

The solar era has begun: the industry is booming, prices are dropping, and solar energy at last seems poised to help topple the climate-altering dominance of fossil fuels. But bringing it to the masses won’t be as simple as just soaking up the sun. Electric companies and solar developers are watching Hawaii.

NYT: Slaughterhouses

NYT: Slaughterhouses

So-called ag-gag laws, proposed or enacted in about a dozen states, make, or would make, criminals of animal-rights activists who take covert pictures and videos of conditions on industrial farms and slaughterhouses. Some would even classify the activists as terrorists.

NYT: Engineering Serendipity

NYT: Engineering Serendipity

Silicon Valley is obsessed with serendipity. Armed with social network maps, managers can spot isolated teams and structural holes, tweaking the organizational structure in real time. Rather than wait for their employees to cross paths, they could simply make the necessary introductions.

Economist: Fixing Fat Cats

Economist: Fixing Fat Cats

On March 3rd, 68% of the Swiss electorate passed the “people’s initiative against fat-cat pay”, a measure that requires listed companies to offer shareholders a binding vote on senior managers’ pay and appointments at each annual general meeting. Criminal penalties apply in the event of non-compliance.

Economist: Corporate Governance

Economist: Corporate Governance

Shareholders used to mount activist campaigns only at firms that were performing horribly. Even then, shareholder activism was rare. But since the financial crisis of 2008, which revealed widespread flaws in corporate governance, shareholders have flexed their muscles more often.

Economist: Sharing Economy

Economist: Sharing Economy

Why pay through the nose for something when you can rent it more cheaply from a stranger online? That is the principle behind a range of online services that enable people to share cars, accommodation, bicycles, household appliances and other items, connecting owners of underused assets with others willing to pay to use them.

Wired: Science of Swarms

Wired: Science of Swarms

For more than a century people have tried to understand how individuals become unified groups. The secrets of the swarm hinted at a whole new way of looking at the world. But those secrets were hidden for decades. When it came to figuring out collectives, nobody had the methods or the math.

Economist: US Health Policy

Economist: US Health Policy

“NANNY”, “tyrant”—these were among the charges hurled at Michael Bloomberg, New York’s mayor, when he proposed a ban on big fizzy-drink bottles last May. The billionaire shrugged and pushed forward. The American Beverage Association, which represents Coca-Cola and other soda companies, has sued.

Economist: Marijuana Legislation

Economist: Marijuana Legislation

FREE-THE-WEED campaigners speak not of “legalising” marijuana but of “taxing and regulating” it. The ballot measure they placed before Colorado’s voters last November, which won the support of 55% of them, was called the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act and contained provisions for a 15% excise tax.

Wired: Clayton Christensen

Wired: Clayton Christensen

Sixteen years ago a book by Clayton Christensen changed business thinking forever. The Innovator’s Dilemma looked at industries and exposed a surprising phenomenon: When big companies fail, it’s often not because they do something wrong but because they do everything right.

New Yorker: New Deal

New Yorker: New Deal

Discusses how government, and the Democratic Party, changed after the New Deal, with the onset of the Cold War and the disenchantment of Southern Democrats. Discusses the history of worries about the emergence of a new ruling class composed of bureaucrats and technocrats.

Reuters: Political Clout of Superrich

Reuters: Political Clout of Superrich

Study shows that in the United States, voting rights do not translate into much actual political power. You could predict what the government would do based on the preferences of the top 10% income level. When the preferences of middle class and poor income levels diverged from the affluent, there was no impact at all on the policies that were adopted.

Patagonia

Patagonia

Patagonia wants to be in business for a good long time, and a healthy planet is necessary for a healthy business. We want to leave behind not only a habitable planet, but an Earth whose beauty and biodiversity is protected for those who come after us. We think that business can inspire solutions to the environmental crisis.

Global Witness

Global Witness

Global Witness investigates and campaigns to prevent natural resource related conflict and corruption, and associated environmental and human rights abuses. From undercover investigations, to high level lobby meetings, we aim to engage on every level where we might make a difference and bring about change.

Secure World Foundation

Secure World Foundation

Secure World Foundation envisions the secure, sustainable and peaceful uses of outer space contributing to global stability on Earth. SWF works with governments, industry, international organizations and civil society to develop and promote ideas and actions that achieve the secure, sustainable, and peaceful uses of outer space.

NYT: Unjust Financier Perk

NYT: Unjust Financier Perk

Of the many injustices that permeate America’s byzantine tax code, few are as outrageous as the tax rate on “carried interest” — the profits made by private equity and hedge fund managers, as well as venture capitalists and partners in real estate investment trusts. This huge tax benefit enriches an already privileged sliver of financiers and violates basic standards of fairness and common sense.

Foreign Policy: New Westphalian Web

Foreign Policy: New Westphalian Web

Nearly 365 years ago, more than 100 warring diplomats and princes got together and created the basic framework for territorial sovereignty: nation-states, demarcated by borders. But 30 years ago, humanity gave birth to the internet. With the flip of a switch, three engineers had undone the work of more than 100 princes and diplomats.

Brookings: Making Defense Affordable

Brookings: Making Defense Affordable

The U.S. government faces a tough fiscal future. Absent significant changes to current taxation and spending policies, debt held by the public will mount within two decades to levels never before experienced by this country. The consequences for the American economy and for the nation’s place in the world could be severe.

Foreign Affairs: Lean Forward

Foreign Affairs: Lean Forward

Now, more than ever, the United States might be tempted to pull back from the world. That would be a mistake, since an engaged grand strategy has served the country exceptionally well for the past six decades — helping prevent the outbreak of conflict in the world’s most important regions, keeping the global economy humming, and facilitating international cooperation.

Foreign Affairs: Pull Back

Foreign Affairs: Pull Back

The United States has consistently spent hundreds of billions of dollars per year on its military. This undisciplined, expensive, and bloody strategy has done untold harm to U.S. national security. This undisciplined strategy has done untold harm to U.S. national security. It is time to abandon the United States’ hegemonic strategy and replace it with one of restraint.

Foreign Affairs: Capitalism/Inequality

Foreign Affairs: Capitalism/Inequality

Recent political debate in the United States and other advanced capitalist democracies has been dominated by two issues: the rise of economic inequality and the scale of government intervention to address it. Inequality is increasing almost everywhere in the postindustrial capitalist world. The problem is more deeply rooted and intractable than generally recognized.

FLOW

FLOW

FLOW refers to an optimal state of human experience in which individuals are fully engaged in creative endeavors, experiencing fulfillment, happiness, and well-being; and the means by which increases in the free global flow of goods, services, capital, people, and information will accelerate human progress and well-being.

Economist: Higher Education

Economist: Higher Education

There is growing anxiety in America about higher education. A degree has always been considered the key to a good job. But rising fees and increasing student debt, combined with shrinking financial and educational returns, are undermining at least the perception that university is a good investment.

Foreign Affairs: Post-Democracy in China

Foreign Affairs: Post-Democracy in China

In November 2012, the Chinese Communist Party held its 18th National Congress. Some in China and the West have gone so far as to predict the demise of the one-party state, which they allege cannot survive if leading politicians stop delivering economic miracles. Such pessimism is misplaced; in the next decade, China will continue to rise, not fade.

Wired: Megacompanies Roping Us In

Wired: Megacompanies Roping Us In

For all the focus on outsourcing, economic forces are actually pushing corporate giants to grow larger. We’ve been told that our unbounded connectivity will favor the rise of small, nimble organizations. But the rise of technology has conferred immense advantages on the Goliaths of American industry.

Wired: The Patent Problem

Wired: The Patent Problem

The consequences of our current patent crisis reverberate far beyond Silicon Valley. What can’t be measured are the products that are never built—taking on even bogus patents is too much of a hurdle for some innovators. Patents were meant to encourage innovation, but lately they are being used as a weapon to stop it.

Foreign Affairs: It’s Hard in America

Foreign Affairs: It’s Hard in America

One of the United States’ major successes in the last half century has been its progress toward ensuring that its citizens get roughly the same basic chances in life, regardless of gender or race. Yet this achievement has been double edged. Today, people who were born worse off tend to have fewer opportunities in life.

NYT: When ‘Super PACs’ Become Lobbyists

NYT: When ‘Super PACs’ Become Lobbyists

The “super PACs” and secret-money groups that polluted this year’s election with hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of largely ineffective attack ads are not slinking away in shame. Many are regrouping and raising more money to lobby Congress and the White House on behalf of their special-interest donors.

The Economist: For Richer, For Poorer

The Economist: For Richer, For Poorer

The democratisation of living standards has masked a dramatic concentration of incomes over the past 30 years, on a scale that matches, or even exceeds, the first Gilded Age. Including capital gains, the share of national income going to the richest 1% of Americans has doubled since 1980, from 10% to 20%, roughly where it was a century ago.

Thomas Piketty: Economist

Thomas Piketty: Economist

Thomas Picketty, Professor of Economics, specializes in economic inequality with his works covering both theoretical and normative issues. His scholarship includes work on long-term economic inequality, the evolution of inequalities in France, and comparative studies of different developed systems.

Emmanuel Saez: Economist

Emmanuel Saez: Economist

Emmanuel Saez is the Director of the Center for Equitable Growth at the University of California at Berkeley. His main areas of research are centered around taxation, redistribution, and inequality, both from a theoretical and empirical perspective. He recommends much higher taxes on the rich.

NYT: For Two Economists…

NYT: For Two Economists…

Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty have tracked the incomes of the poor, the middle class and the rich in countries across the world. Their work shows that the top earners in the United States have taken a bigger and bigger share of overall income over the last three decades, with inequality nearly as acute as it was before the Great Depression.

TRAFFIC

TRAFFIC

TRAFFIC is a wildlife trade monitoring network that works to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals does not threaten the conservation of nature. TRAFFIC is a global research-driven and action-oriented network committed to delivering innovative and practical conservation solutions.

CB – Initiative on Global Markets

CB – Initiative on Global Markets

The massive global movements of capital, products, and talent in the modern economy have fundamentally changed the nature of business in the 21st century. The Chicago Booth Initiative on Global Markets supports original research on international business, financial markets and public policies.

David Lyon: Professor

David Lyon: Professor

David Lyon is the Principal Investigator of The New Transparency Project and Director of the Surveillance Studies Centre. He is also Queen’s Research Chair in Surveillance Studies and Professor of Sociology and of Law.

The Culture of Surveillance

The Culture of Surveillance

In the late 20th century the language of “surveillance society” was popularized but now the outlines of “surveillance cultures” are emerging.

Wired: NSA Spy Center

Wired: NSA Spy Center

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. The heavily fortified $2 billion center will store all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.

CorpWatch

CorpWatch

The actions of private corporations have very real impact on public life. CorpWatch employs investigative research and journalism to expose corporate malfeasance and to advocate for multinational corporate accountability and transparency.

IGLHR

IGLHR

The mission of the Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights is to promote and defend human, women’s and worker’s rights in the global economy. With a highly experienced team of international advocates, the IGLHR supports exploited workers all over the developing world.

Pavan Sukhdev: Economist

Pavan Sukhdev: Economist

Pavan Sukhdev is McCluskey Fellow at Yale University. Building on 25 years of financial markets experience, his work is focused in showing how corporations and society can and should work together to achieve common goals and build a green economy.

PERI: UMass Amherst

PERI: UMass Amherst

The Political Economy Research Institute promotes human and ecological well-being by translating research into workable policy proposals capable of improving life on our planet today, and in the future. PERI strives to make a workable science out of morality.

Brian Collins: The Great Shock

Brian Collins: The Great Shock

The global financial system still teeters on the brink of collapse, and virtually nothing has been done to avert another disaster. With the spectacle of “extend and pretend” unfolding, what needs explaining is why even the well-informed and high-minded remain committed to so unpromising a status quo.

NYT: A Facial Theory of Politics

NYT: A Facial Theory of Politics

On April 21, 2012, Leonard Mlodinow published an Op-Ed in the New York Times Sunday Review titled, A Facial Theory of Politics. The article describes studies made into the effect of visual cues on electoral results. “How important is a political candidate’s appearance? We’re all worldly enough to understand that looks matter. You probably know about the famous 1960 presidential debate between an unshaven and tired Richard Nixon and a tanned and rested John F. Kennedy: those who watched on television generally thought Kennedy won the debate, while those who listened over the radio overwhelmingly favored Nixon. Still, even the most jaded politico assumes that appearance is a relatively small factor — and one that we are basically aware of. Everyone knew that part of Kennedy’s appeal was how he looked…”

INET: The Coase Theorem as Fiction

INET: The Coase Theorem as Fiction

When externalities are present and transaction costs are absent, private parties will strike welfare-enhancing deals regardless of who owns what. In a frictionless world, bargaining leads to efficiency. That is the essence of the Coase Theorem, and it is fiction, according to Steven Medema.

Leonard Mlodinow: Physicist

Leonard Mlodinow: Physicist

Leonard Mlodinow is a professor of probability and random processes at CalTech. He authored “Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior”, a startling and eye-opening examination of how the unconscious mind shapes our experience of the world.

Barry Schwartz: Professor

Barry Schwartz: Professor

Barry Schwartz is Dorwin Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and Action at Swarthmore College, and author of the books: The Costs of Living: How Market Freedom Erodes the Best Things in Life; The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less; The Battle for Human Nature: Science, Morality, and Modern Life.

Daniel Kahneman: Professor

Daniel Kahneman: Professor

Daniel Kahneman is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus, and Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus, at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, and author of the book, “Thinking Fast and Slow”.

Adam Curtis: Filmmaker

Adam Curtis: Filmmaker

Adam Curtis is a BAFTA-winning documentary filmmaker, whose work includes The Century of the Self, an award winning documentary film on how Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud, and Edward Bernays influenced the way corporations and governments have analyzed and controlled ‬people.

OECD: Regulatory Reform

OECD: Regulatory Reform

The OECD Int’l Regulation Database compiles a set of quantitative indicators to measure cross-country differences in product market regulations in recent years. The database is used in reviews of regulatory reform and analyses of regulation on economic performance in Member countries.

GAO: Consumer Protection

GAO: Consumer Protection

The Government Accountability Office provides public access to its wide-ranging research related to Business Regulation and Consumer Protection. Covered topics include Securities Regulation, Product Safety, Federal Antitrust Policy, and Healthcare Price Transparency.

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