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Wired: The Secret War

Wired: The Secret War

General Keith Alexander is director of the world’s largest intelligence service, the National Security Agency; chief of the Central Security Service; and commander of the US Cyber Command. In his telling, the cyber threat is so huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger.

Bloomberg: Supreme Court and Business

Bloomberg: Supreme Court and Business

The 2012-13 high court session, which concluded June 26, saw the justices continue a multiyear pattern of interpreting regulations and statutes in a manner that insulates corporations from liability risks. The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has narrowed the avenues available to employees and consumers seeking to take their grievances before a judge.

NYT: Roberts Slowly Pulls Right

NYT: Roberts Slowly Pulls Right

Viewed in isolation, the Supreme Court term that just ended had elements of modesty, but Chief Justice Roberts is a canny strategist with a tough side whose methodical approach has allowed him to establish a robustly conservative record. When the court struck down a part of the Voting Rights Act, Roberts harvested seeds he had planted four years before.

NYT: Robert’s Long Game

NYT: Robert’s Long Game

In an opinion brimming with a self-confidence that he hides behind a cloak of judicial minimalism, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for a conservative Supreme Court majority in Shelby County v. Holder, cripples Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. The decision is characteristic of a pattern in the Roberts court, in which the conservative justices tee up major constitutional issues for dramatic reversal.

The Bureau: Drone Rulebook Questions Remain

The Bureau: Drone Rulebook Questions Remain

White House national security officials have released two key documents. The first, US Policy Standards and Procedures for the Use of Force in Counterterrorism, lays out the standards now being used to decide whether to deploy ‘lethal force’ outside the battlefield. The White House has also released the transcript of a background briefing for journalists, in which anonymous senior administration officials offer their interpretation of the new guidance.

NoC: NSA 9/11 Fact Check

NoC: NSA 9/11 Fact Check

In defending the NSA’s sweeping collection of Americans’ phone call records, Obama administration officials have repeatedly pointed out how it could have helped thwart the 9/11 attacks. Former Vice President Dick Cheney has invoked the same argument. They have all ignored a key aspect of historical record.

Guardian: FISA Court

Guardian: FISA Court

Various NSA defenders beginning with President Obama have sought to assure the public that NSA surveillance is done under robust judicial oversight and that they do not target Americans. These claims are highly misleading, and in some cases outright false As part of the FISA court approval process, the NSA must submit a document describing how communications of US persons are collected and what is done with them; indeed, the principle purpose of the 2008 FISA Amendment Act was to allow government collection of Americans’ international communications. The Obama DOJ has repeatedly thwarted any efforts to obtain judicial rulings on whether this law is consistent with the Fourth Amendment.

Foreign Affairs: American Strategy

Foreign Affairs: American Strategy

Events in the greater Middle East are making it difficult for the United States to limit its involvement there. The irony is inescapable: a decade ago, Washington chose to immerse itself in the region when it did not have to, but now that most Americans want little to do with the region, U.S. officials are finding it difficult to turn away.

New Yorker: Silicon Valley and Politics

New Yorker: Silicon Valley and Politics

Like industries that preceded it, Silicon Valley is not a philosophy, a revolution, or a cause. If this new generation of smart, wealthy, successful tech leaders want to make a difference in terms of policy, it’s the right idea to leave their cool headquarters and gorgeous campuses and actually engage.

Brookings: The Case for Drones

Brookings: The Case for Drones

Drone warfare is here to stay, and it is likely to expand in the years to come. Washington must continue to improve its drone policy, spelling out clearer rules for extrajudicial and extraterritorial killings so that tyrannical regimes will have a harder time pointing to the U.S. drone program to justify attacks against political opponents.

NoC: Looting of Detroit

NoC: Looting of Detroit

Detroit, which grew and prospered for much of the last century, has become a wasteland of abandoned buildings, lawlessness, and municipal debts. Somebody’s going to pay for that. It’s not going to be the politicians whose decisions undermined Detroit, nor the executives who made bad decisions yet retired with their full pensions and portfolios.

Foreign Affairs: Millennium Dev Goals

Foreign Affairs: Millennium Dev Goals

The Millennium Development Goals have unified, galvanized, and expanded efforts to help the world’s poorest people. The goals will expire on December 31, 2015, and the debate over what should come next is now in full swing. But prior to deciding on a new framework, the world community must evaluate exactly what the MDG effort has achieved so far.

Foreign Affairs: US and Int’l Crime

Foreign Affairs: US and Int’l Crime

Far from being a passive victim, the United States has fostered as rich a tradition of illicit trade as any other country in the world. Since its founding, the United States has had an intimate relationship with clandestine commerce, and contraband capitalism was integral to the rise of the U.S. economy.

NoC: Online Spying

NoC: Online Spying

Verizon has been supplying the National Security Agency (NSA) with phone records for all domestic calls, and the NSA and FBI are datamining nine technology companies, extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs enabling analysts to track a person’s movements and contacts over time.

NYT: Obama and Bush’s Data Mining

NYT: Obama and Bush’s Data Mining

Mr. Obama has used some of the same aggressive powers in the name of guarding national security as his predecessor, even at the expense of civil liberties. Rather than dismantling Mr. Bush’s approach to national security, Mr. Obama has to some extent validated it and put it on a more sustainable footing.

NoC: Icelandic Revolution

NoC: Icelandic Revolution

The struggle in Iceland is ongoing, but the nation’s people have achieved monumental results in a relatively short amount of time due to the nature of their movement building – five goals should be sought in the US: Strive For Unity, Turn a Few Central Demands into Goals, Be the Banks, Be the Government, Crowdsource a New Constitution.

NYT: Leak Investigations

NYT: Leak Investigations

With the decision to label a Fox News television reporter a possible “co-conspirator” in a criminal investigation of a news leak, the Obama administration has moved beyond protecting government secrets to threatening fundamental freedoms of the press to gather news. Obama administration officials, accusing a reporter of being a “co-conspirator,” on top of other zealous and secretive investigations, show a heavy tilt toward secrecy and insufficient concern about a free press.

GAO: Improvements to IRS

GAO: Improvements to IRS

During its audit of the IRS 2012 financial statements, GAO identified one new internal control deficiency that contributed to material weakness in internal control over unpaid tax assessments – IRS’s controls over estimating the balances of federal taxes receivable and other unpaid tax assessments were not effectively implemented.

The Centrist Party

The Centrist Party

The Centrist Party need not be a mush of compromises between extreme positions. It should take the best of each party and ditch the nonsense. The Centrists will be fiscally sensible, socially progressive, and committed to the kinds of compromises that will appeal to the tens of millions of voters, particularly younger voters, who are currently without a political home.

The Common Sense Coalition

The Common Sense Coalition

As founders of the Common Sense Coalition, we came together in 2011 because we share a belief that our country has serious problems and that the current political environment leaves little hope of solving them. As we began to explore the consequences of inaction, it became clear that the America we leave our children would be greatly diminished, if we didn’t act.

No Labels

No Labels

No Labels is a growing citizens’ movement of Democrats, Republicans and everything in between dedicated to promoting a new politics of problem solving. No Labels promotes its politics of problem solving in three ways: by organizing citizens across America, providing a space for legislators who want to solve problems to convene and by pushing for common-sense reforms to make our government work.

GAO: Efficiency and Effectiveness

GAO: Efficiency and Effectiveness

GAO’s 2013 annual report identifies 31 new areas where agencies may be able to achieve greater efficiency or effectiveness – many areas involve fragmentation, overlap, or duplication – the Department of Defense could realize up to $82 million in cost savings and ensure equivalent performance by taking addressing its fragmented approach to developing and acquiring combat uniforms.

Brookings: Regulating NonBank SIFIs

Brookings: Regulating NonBank SIFIs

Once a non-bank financial institution has been designated as a SIFI, very real questions arise as to how best to regulate these institutions. The Fed has promised to pay careful attention to the differences between banks and other financial institutions that are designated as SIFIs. Elliott emphasizes it is crucial that they be rigorous in doing so.

NYT: Wiretap Laws

NYT: Wiretap Laws

The Obama administration, resolving years of internal debate, is on the verge of backing a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan for a sweeping overhaul of surveillance laws that would make it easier to wiretap people who communicate using the Internet rather than by traditional phone services, according to officials familiar with the deliberations.

NYT: Beyond the Fence

NYT: Beyond the Fence

The opponents of immigration reform have many small complaints, but they really have one core concern. It’s about control. America doesn’t control its borders. But the opponents rarely say what exactly it is they are trying to control. They talk about border security and various mechanisms to achieve that, but they rarely go into detail about what we should be so vigilant about restricting.

Niall Ferguson: Historian

Niall Ferguson: Historian

Niall Ferguson is Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford. His books include Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire, The War of the World: Twentieth-Century Conflict and the Descent of the West, and The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World.

IISS: Geopolitics

IISS: Geopolitics

Economic growth, when widely shared, does more than increase living standards, it helps ease tensions within societies. Trade has an important role to play in boosting both growth and security, even more so when complemented by policies to ensure that its benefits are widely shared. Geopolitics is back. Or at least it should be – what we have been seeing instead is a paradox.

NYT: Stories of Creativity

NYT: Stories of Creativity

The $85 billion in federal budget cuts known as sequestration are beginning to be felt far from the nation’s capital, some programs are coping, some are struggling and others appear to be out of luck. While not everyone is feeling the pain, the good-news stories are eclipsed by the bad. At issue for many programs is politics — specifically the politics of President Obama’s health care law.

Richard Haass: CFR President

Richard Haass: CFR President

Dr. Richard Haass is president of the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, he was director of policy planning for the Department of State, U.S. coordinator for policy toward the future of Afghanistan, and U.S. envoy to the Northern Ireland peace process.

NYT: Heading the Wrong Way

NYT: Heading the Wrong Way

At first glance, the latest economic growth report, released Friday, appears to show the economy revving up. In reality, the economy is either stuck in low gear, or worse, slowing to a stop as budget cuts harm not only the users of overstretched government services but the overall economy.

Nation of Change: Government Hollowing

Nation of Change: Government Hollowing

Repealing laws by failing to fund their enforcement or implementation works because the public doesn’t know it’s happening. The strategy bolsters the Republican view that government is incompetent – the public doesn’t know the reason why the government isn’t doing its job is it’s being hollowed out.

NYT: Corporations and Supreme Court

NYT: Corporations and Supreme Court

The Supreme Court’s business decisions are almost always overshadowed by cases on controversial social issues. But the business docket reflects something truly distinctive about the court led by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. They have been, a new study finds, far friendlier to business than those of any court since at least World War II.

Foreign Affairs: Cyber Spies

Foreign Affairs: Cyber Spies

Espionage of any kind is serious, of course, but some do not understand how spying in the cyber world is different from spying in the physical world. Few realize that the same tools required to conduct digital espionage could allow intruders to go a step further and commit digital destruction.

The Economist: Tech Regulation

The Economist: Tech Regulation

SILICON VALLEY has long tried to keep Washington, DC, at arm’s length. But as Google, Facebook and other web firms have grown too big for the government to ignore, their executives have been spending more time in the nation’s capital. Among their ports of call are the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission.

The Economist: Role of Government

The Economist: Role of Government

America’s 50 states are competing to find the best formula for regulation and taxes and introducing sweeping reforms to that end. These changes will become systematic only if promoted at the federal level.

New Yorker: Senses of Entitlement

New Yorker: Senses of Entitlement

Names make news, but names also make opinions. In politics, the naming is almost always with malice (or niceness) aforethought. “Entitlements” – or “entitlement programs” – is now the standard descriptor for what ought to be called, more accurately and less tendentiously, social insurance.

The New Yorker: The Thatcherist

The New Yorker: The Thatcherist

Thatcher was a breaker of consensus, not a builder of it. And she did not care about everybody. She seemed not to care about the poor and the near-poor, whose misfortunes she tended to regard as failures of character. The moral high point of her tenure was a passionate speech on global warming, delivered at the United Nations in 1989.

Brookings: Marijuana Policy

Brookings: Marijuana Policy

Stuart Taylor, Jr. examines how the federal government and the eighteen states (plus the District of Columbia) that have partially legalized medical or recreational marijuana or both since 1996 can be true to their respective laws, and can agree on how to enforce them wisely while avoiding federal-state clashes that would increase confusion and harm communities and consumers.

Brookings: Careful Drones

Brookings: Careful Drones

American University professor Akbar Ahmed’s new book, The Thistle and the Drone, cautions wisely about the geostrategic dangers that can result if Washington is seen as using force disproportionately or carelessly in ways that hurt innocent people. However, the United States has made huge progress in minimizing civilian casualties.

Brookings: Legalized Marijuana

Brookings: Legalized Marijuana

In November, two states, Colorado and Washington, passed ballot initiatives — by strong margins — to legalize marijuana use. Avoiding a state-federal train wreck over marijuana policy will not happen automatically. Finding a cooperative path requires creativity and energy from both levels of government. But the alternative won’t satisfy anyone, at least not for long.

Brookings: Students and Immigration

Brookings: Students and Immigration

Despite bipartisan consensus in favor of retaining foreign students studying at U.S. universities to make America economically competitive, Congress continues to disagree over the details. Very soon, the American public will see some version of these proposals in a much-anticipated comprehensive immigration reform bill.

Nation of Change: Margaret Thatcher

Nation of Change: Margaret Thatcher

However one feels about Thatcher’s politics, there’s no question that she chose crusades and framed arguments with great care. For her pragmatism, much of today’s Republican right would have panned Thatcher as “socialist,” “statist” and, heaven forfend, “European” — though they now hail her.

New Yorker: The Dark Ages

New Yorker: The Dark Ages

In 2001, George W. Bush signed a military order concerning the “Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism.” Suspected terrorists could be imprisoned without charge, denied knowledge of the evidence against them, and, if tried, sentenced by courts following no previously established rules.

New Yorker: Justice Ginsburg

New Yorker: Justice Ginsburg

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg turns eighty this month. There is some irony in Ginsburg’s reputation for reserve, because she is, by far, the current Court’s most accomplished litigator. Ginsburg, during the 1970s, argued several of the most important women’s-rights cases in the Court’s history.

Bloomberg: Trouble with Drones

Bloomberg: Trouble with Drones

For a country exhausted after more than a decade of war, remote-controlled drones are undeniably tempting. Obama has yet to explain the basics of the broader policy, but that wall of silence is starting to erode. This new pledge of accountability comes amid growing international criticism.

Economist: US, and Europe’s Dysfunction

Economist: US, and Europe’s Dysfunction

Republicans and Democrats’ fibs rest on ill-concealed contempt for an undeserving other: the feckless poor, the immoral rich, those who live in states of the wrong partisan hue. Mutual dislike is the dirty secret that best explains European paralysis. American politicians have no business stoking it in their far more ambitious union.

Economist: Marijuana Legislation

Economist: Marijuana Legislation

FREE-THE-WEED campaigners speak not of “legalising” marijuana but of “taxing and regulating” it. The ballot measure they placed before Colorado’s voters last November, which won the support of 55% of them, was called the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act and contained provisions for a 15% excise tax.

Economist: Green Steps

Economist: Green Steps

Mr Obama named the officials charged with fulfilling his climate policy: Gina McCarthy, his choice to head the Environmental Protection Agency, and Ernest Moniz, the prospective new secretary of energy. Their selection suggests that Mr Obama is indeed serious about tackling climate change, but not doctrinaire in his approach.

New Yorker: New Deal

New Yorker: New Deal

Discusses how government, and the Democratic Party, changed after the New Deal, with the onset of the Cold War and the disenchantment of Southern Democrats. Discusses the history of worries about the emergence of a new ruling class composed of bureaucrats and technocrats.

Reuters: Political Clout of Superrich

Reuters: Political Clout of Superrich

Study shows that in the United States, voting rights do not translate into much actual political power. You could predict what the government would do based on the preferences of the top 10% income level. When the preferences of middle class and poor income levels diverged from the affluent, there was no impact at all on the policies that were adopted.

Secure World Foundation

Secure World Foundation

Secure World Foundation envisions the secure, sustainable and peaceful uses of outer space contributing to global stability on Earth. SWF works with governments, industry, international organizations and civil society to develop and promote ideas and actions that achieve the secure, sustainable, and peaceful uses of outer space.

NYT: Broader US Eavesdropping

NYT: Broader US Eavesdropping

The Supreme Court on Tuesday turned back a challenge to a federal law that broadened the government’s power to eavesdrop on international phone calls and e-mails. The ruling illustrated how hard it is to mount court challenges to a wide array of antiterrorism measures, including renditions of terrorism suspects to foreign countries and targeted killings using drones.

NYT: Our Second Adolescence

NYT: Our Second Adolescence

A dream Obama would point out that the issue is not size but sclerosis of government. The future has no lobby, so there are inexorable pressures favoring present consumption over future investment. The crucial point is not whether a dollar is spent publicly or privately, it’s whether it is spent on the present or future.

IISS: Climate and Security

IISS: Climate and Security

The IISS believes climate change could have a serious effect on regional and global stability. Its Climate Change and Security Programme explores how global warming may affect disputes over territory, water and other resources, or could otherwise threaten peace and stability, and considers international mechanisms for producing the best solutions for climate security.

Foreign Policy: New Westphalian Web

Foreign Policy: New Westphalian Web

Nearly 365 years ago, more than 100 warring diplomats and princes got together and created the basic framework for territorial sovereignty: nation-states, demarcated by borders. But 30 years ago, humanity gave birth to the internet. With the flip of a switch, three engineers had undone the work of more than 100 princes and diplomats.

Brookings: Making Defense Affordable

Brookings: Making Defense Affordable

The U.S. government faces a tough fiscal future. Absent significant changes to current taxation and spending policies, debt held by the public will mount within two decades to levels never before experienced by this country. The consequences for the American economy and for the nation’s place in the world could be severe.

Foreign Affairs: Lean Forward

Foreign Affairs: Lean Forward

Now, more than ever, the United States might be tempted to pull back from the world. That would be a mistake, since an engaged grand strategy has served the country exceptionally well for the past six decades — helping prevent the outbreak of conflict in the world’s most important regions, keeping the global economy humming, and facilitating international cooperation.

Foreign Affairs: Pull Back

Foreign Affairs: Pull Back

The United States has consistently spent hundreds of billions of dollars per year on its military. This undisciplined, expensive, and bloody strategy has done untold harm to U.S. national security. This undisciplined strategy has done untold harm to U.S. national security. It is time to abandon the United States’ hegemonic strategy and replace it with one of restraint.

Economist: Cyber-Warfare Hype and Fear

Economist: Cyber-Warfare Hype and Fear

The Obama administration’s attempt to develop a more coherent doctrine of cyber-warfare is sensible so long as it is not just an excuse for hyping something that has yet to kill anybody. The essence of cyber-warfare is ambiguity and uncertainty, that makes policy both hard to construct and harder still to explain.

Foreign Affairs: Post-Democracy in China

Foreign Affairs: Post-Democracy in China

In November 2012, the Chinese Communist Party held its 18th National Congress. Some in China and the West have gone so far as to predict the demise of the one-party state, which they allege cannot survive if leading politicians stop delivering economic miracles. Such pessimism is misplaced; in the next decade, China will continue to rise, not fade.

Foreign Affairs: Can America Be Fixed?

Foreign Affairs: Can America Be Fixed?

Commentators are prone to seeing the challenges of the moment in unnecessarily apocalyptic terms, yet American democracy is more dysfunctional and commands less authority than ever — and it has fewer levers to pull in a globalized economy. This time, the pessimists might be right.

The Obama Synthesis

The Obama Synthesis

The Brennan nomination crystallizes the ways in which Obama has also cemented and expanded the Bush approach to counterterrorism. We have a far-flung drone campaign that deals death, even to American citizens, on the say-so of the president and a secret administration “nominations” process.

George Lakoff: Professor

George Lakoff: Professor

George Lakoff is Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley, where he has taught since 1972. He is known for his ideas about the centrality of metaphor to human thinking, political behavior and society.

NYT: When ‘Super PACs’ Become Lobbyists

NYT: When ‘Super PACs’ Become Lobbyists

The “super PACs” and secret-money groups that polluted this year’s election with hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of largely ineffective attack ads are not slinking away in shame. Many are regrouping and raising more money to lobby Congress and the White House on behalf of their special-interest donors.

Wired: Obama’s War on Terror

Wired: Obama’s War on Terror

President Barack Obama has closely followed the policy of his predecessor, President George W. Bush, when it comes to tactics used in the “war on terror” — from rendition, targeted killings, state secrets, Guantanamo Bay to domestic spying, according to Michael Hayden, Bush’s former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency.

Wired: NSA Spy Center

Wired: NSA Spy Center

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. The heavily fortified $2 billion center will store all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.

CNN – Will Michelle Obama’s Speech Change History?

CNN – Will Michelle Obama’s Speech Change History?

If Barack Obama is re-elected on November 6, he will owe more to his first lady than any president ever to win a second term. Michelle Obama gave one of the finest speeches ever delivered at a national political convention. More important, it could have more impact on the immediate future of the country than her husband’s celebrated 2004 keynote address to the Democratic National Convention in Boston.

Center for Constitutional Rights

Center for Constitutional Rights

The Center for Constitutional Rights, non-profit legal and educational organization committed to the creative use of law as a positive force for social change, is dedicated to advancing and protecting the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes.

Amnesty International

Amnesty International

Amnesty International works to protect people wherever justice, freedom, truth and dignity are denied. As the world’s largest grassroots human rights organization, it investigates and exposes abuses, educates the public, and helps transform societies to create a safer, more just world.

Center for Progressive Reform

Center for Progressive Reform

The CPR believes sensible safeguards in the areas of health, safety, and the environment, serve important values including doing the best we can to prevent harm to people and the environment, distributing environmental harms and benefits fairly, and protecting the earth for future generations.

American Constitution Society

American Constitution Society

ACS works for positive change by shaping debate on vitally important legal and constitutional issues through development and promotion of high-impact ideas to opinion leaders and the media, and by building networks of lawyers, law students, judges and policymakers dedicated to those ideas.

The National Security Archive

The National Security Archive

The National Security Archive is an investigative journalism center, a research institute, an archive of U.S. documents, a public interest law firm defending and expanding public access to government information, a global advocate of open government, and an indexer and publisher of former secrets.

Sunlight Foundation

Sunlight Foundation

The Sunlight Foundation is a non-profit, nonpartisan organization that uses the internet to catalyze greater government openness and transparency, and engages individual citizens and communities to demand policies that will enable the public to hold government accountable.

Center for Responsive Politics

Center for Responsive Politics

The Center for Responsive Politics is the nation’s premier research group tracking money in U.S. politics and its effect on elections and public policy. The organization aims to create a more educated voter, an involved citizenry and a more transparent and responsive government.

Common Cause

Common Cause

Common Cause, as an independent watchdog against corruption and abuse of power, seeks to restore the core values of American democracy, reinvent an open, honest and accountable government, and empower ordinary people to make their voices heard in the political process.

Why Politicians Get Away With Lying

Why Politicians Get Away With Lying

Maybe it’s a sign that the public has given up on honesty from presidential candidates. The assumption seems to be that politicians will always lie and that voters’ defense against that is fact checking by journalists. But … why do voters let politicians lie to them?

PERI: UMass Amherst

PERI: UMass Amherst

The Political Economy Research Institute promotes human and ecological well-being by translating research into workable policy proposals capable of improving life on our planet today, and in the future. PERI strives to make a workable science out of morality.

NYT: A Facial Theory of Politics

NYT: A Facial Theory of Politics

On April 21, 2012, Leonard Mlodinow published an Op-Ed in the New York Times Sunday Review titled, A Facial Theory of Politics. The article describes studies made into the effect of visual cues on electoral results. “How important is a political candidate’s appearance? We’re all worldly enough to understand that looks matter. You probably know about the famous 1960 presidential debate between an unshaven and tired Richard Nixon and a tanned and rested John F. Kennedy: those who watched on television generally thought Kennedy won the debate, while those who listened over the radio overwhelmingly favored Nixon. Still, even the most jaded politico assumes that appearance is a relatively small factor — and one that we are basically aware of. Everyone knew that part of Kennedy’s appeal was how he looked…”

NYT: Obama’s Secret Kill List

NYT: Obama’s Secret Kill List

In their New York Times article, Secret Kill List Proves a Test of Obama’s Principles and Will, Jo Becker and Scott Shane discuss the Obama Administration’s approach to the fight against terrorism. The article is the third in a series of articles, called A Measure of Change, that assess President Obama’s record.

Fareed Zakaria: Journalist

Fareed Zakaria: Journalist

Fareed Zakaria hosts CNN’s flagship foreign affairs show, is Editor-at-Large of TIME Magazine, and a Washington Post columnist. He is also a New York Times bestselling author of the books: The Post-American World: Release 2.0, The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad.

Joseph Nye: Professor

Joseph Nye: Professor

Joseph S. Nye, Jr., is University Distinguished Service Professor and former Dean of the Kennedy School at Harvard University, and author of the book: The Future of Power in the 21st Century, which provides a roadmap for a foreign policy to deal with the challenges of a global information age.

Michael Sandel: Professor

Michael Sandel: Professor

Michael Sandel is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government at Harvard University. He has been teaching political philosophy at Harvard for more than 30 years. He is the author of the books, Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?, and, What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets.

OECD: Regulatory Reform

OECD: Regulatory Reform

The OECD Int’l Regulation Database compiles a set of quantitative indicators to measure cross-country differences in product market regulations in recent years. The database is used in reviews of regulatory reform and analyses of regulation on economic performance in Member countries.

OECD: Public Governance

OECD: Public Governance

The Regulatory Policy Division builds policy support for the development of good regulations in member countries. Particular emphasis is placed on researching and disseminating information on best practice relating to regulatory policy, institutions and tools.

EPI: Regulatory Policy

EPI: Regulatory Policy

The Economic Policy Institute (EPI) Regulatory Policy Research program debunks claims that regulations impede job creation and addresses attempts to roll back laws that protect the environment and guarantee worker protections.

EPI: Public Investment

EPI: Public Investment

The Economic Policy Institute’s (EPI) research shows a need for significant public investment to reverse decades of neglect to US infrastructure and society. Investment will create jobs and modernize the US economy. Experts include Josh Bivens, Andrew Fieldhouse, Ethan Pollack, and Rebecca Thiess.

IPS: Foreign Policy in Focus

IPS: Foreign Policy in Focus

The Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) Foreign Policy In Focus (FPIF) connects the research and action of more than 600 scholars, advocates, and activists seeking to make the United States a more responsible global partner.

IPS: Cities for Progress

IPS: Cities for Progress

The Institute for Policy Studies Cities for Progress is a growing network of locally-elected officials and community-based activists working together for social change. CFP is a network that incorporates local, national and global approaches to issues that affect us in our own communities.

PI: US Economic Policy

PI: US Economic Policy

The Peterson Institute’s US Economic Policy research pertains to the topics: Economic Sanctions; Foreign Aid and Technical Assistance; Trade Disputes; Trade Promotion Authority; US Monetary and Fiscal Policy; and US Trade Policy. Research includes Policy Briefs and Working Papers.

EPI: Fed Budget, Deficits, and Taxes

EPI: Fed Budget, Deficits, and Taxes

The Economic Policy Institute’s work on national fiscal policy analyzes deficits, revenues, and spending within the federal budget, but in the context of the overall U.S. economy. EPI believes that the federal budget is the embodiment of our nation’s priorities.

OECD: Corporate Governance

OECD: Corporate Governance

The OECD Principles of Corporate Governance are the benchmark for good corporate governance. They are used by governments, regulators, investors, corporations and stakeholders and have been adopted by the Financial Stability Board as one of the Twelve Key Standards for Sound Financial Systems.

Institute for Policy Studies (IPS)

Institute for Policy Studies (IPS)

The Institute for Policy Studies has served as a policy and research resource for visionary social justice movements for over four decades — from the anti-war and civil rights movements in the 1960s to the peace and global justice movements of the last decade.

Congressional Research Service

Congressional Research Service

American taxpayers spend over $100 million a year to fund the Congressional Research Service, a “think tank” that provides reports to members of Congress on a variety of topics relevant to current political events. Open CRS provides access to CRS Reports that are already in the public domain.

Copenhagen Consensus Center

Copenhagen Consensus Center

The Copenhagen Consensus Center is a think-tank that publicizes 
the best ways for governments and philanthropists to spend aid and development money. CCC focuses on solving the world’s biggest challenges and on how to do this in the most cost-efficient manner.

GAO: Tax Policy and Administration

GAO: Tax Policy and Administration

The US Government Accountability Office provides public access to its wide-ranging research related to Tax Policy and Administration. The GAO is an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for Congress – it investigates how the federal government spends taxpayer dollars.

GAO: International Affairs

GAO: International Affairs

The Government Accountability Office provides public access to its wide-ranging research related to International Affairs. Covered topics include Terrorism, Human Rights, Aids Relief, Export Controls, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Humanitarian and Development Assistance, and Diplomacy.

GAO: Government Operations

GAO: Government Operations

The Government Accountability Office provides public access to its wide-ranging research related to Government Operations. Covered topics include Streamlining Government, Management, Social Security, Federal Employees, US Postal Service, Lobbying, Federal Contracting, and Transportation.

GAO: Consumer Protection

GAO: Consumer Protection

The Government Accountability Office provides public access to its wide-ranging research related to Business Regulation and Consumer Protection. Covered topics include Securities Regulation, Product Safety, Federal Antitrust Policy, and Healthcare Price Transparency.

GAO: Budget and Spending

GAO: Budget and Spending

The Government Accountability Office provides public access to its wide-ranging research related to Budgets and Spending. Covered topics include Fiscal Outlook, Government Operations, Strategic Sourcing, Budget and Spending, Medicaid, Streamlining Government, and Public Transportation.

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